SṈIDȻEȽ Restoration Project

In 2006, the BC Conservation Corps employed a team of workers to establish terrestrial restoration sites in the area surrounding the inlet. From 2006 – 2010, SeaChange staff maintained these sites through school programs and volunteer restoration days. In 2010, the terrestrial restoration work was developed into a landscape level restoration plan linking all the sites together; and regular volunteer days were established to develop and expand the restoration sites. Additionally, many school programs and community groups participate annually in the restoration of these sites.

The lower sites (sites 6 and 7) reflect a mosaic of diverse forest ecosystems, leading from a coniferous edge zone (site 6a and part of 6b) to a large cottonwood (Populus balsamifera) stand (site 6b, 6c, 7a). The cottonwood stand is also mixed with early successional stage forest species such as bigleaf maple (Acer macrophyllum), red alder (Alnus rubra) and nootka rose (Rosa nutkana). Sites 8, 10 and 13 represent the ecotone of mixed deciduous and coniferous forest between the areas heavily modified by past industrial activities and the more mature, intact forest community in the eastern section of the project area. Site 13 represents very dramatically the many cultural layers that exist at SṈIDȻEȽ; its restoration has significant public appeal and provides a high visibility centerpiece for this work. Site 11 has some qualities of a moist forest being downslope from a wetland ecosystem, and the drainage areas in particular may be restored in conjunction with future wetland restoration (site 12a). Site 19 and the Chinese midden site are within the mature forest areas of SṈIDȻEȽ.

The modified soils of some of our newest restoration sites (6 & 7) present a unique set of circumstances due to the significant amount of concrete debris littering the area. We have taken an active approach to soil restoration to jump start the ecological recovery in these areas through the generous application of leaf mulch to the land over the autumn and winter. We predominantly use leaves which are appropriate to the forest ecosystems of SṈIDȻEȽ; throughout the autumn, we gather red alder and bigleaf maple leaves from the local area (with a lot of help from local residents!) and cover our sites with these leaves. These leaves nourish the soil to the correct acidity and introduce the fungal and bacterial relationships back onto the land so our planted species can thrive.

Our choices of plantings are informed by concepts of ecological resilience. Pioneer species such as alder, maple, and cottonwood grow quickly and, being deciduous, provide shade for the exposed sites during the summer then drop their leaves each winter to foster the soil enrichment of the site. Pioneer species also create niche habitats which facilitate the natural regeneration of other shrub and herbaceous native species on these sites. This approach to restoration imitates the natural succession stages of ecosystems after disturbances and allows for ecosystem adaptation in the face of a changing climate.

Each restoration site at SṈIDȻEȽ has a place in the larger landscape of the inlet area and the wider bioregion outside park boundaries. Archeological remnants of the homes and buildings associated with the cement factory are the sites of the most ecological disturbance at SṈIDȻEȽ, and the focus of our invasive plant removal efforts. Tsartlip First Nation, who hold a claim on this sacred W̱SÁNEĆ place, works in partnernship with SeaChange to do this restoration work in respectful ways which respect and honour the W̱SÁNEĆ connection to SṈIDȻEȽ, such as planting traditional W̱SÁNEĆ foods and medicines. Many W̱SÁNEĆ youth and community members are active participants in this restoration work and lead the vision for the future of SṈIDȻEȽ. We hope our restoration sites offer park visitors some insight into a complex history of this special place and invite a cultural exploration into the ecology of the area.

 

Site 6c

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Site 7a

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Site 7b South

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Site 7b West

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Site 7c Shoreline

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Site 10c

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Site 13

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Restoration Blog

SṈIDȻEȽ Volunteer Day May 20

SṈIDȻEȽ Volunteer Day May 20

Greetings​ SeaChange volunteers, O​ur next restoration​ volunteer day is from 10am-2pm this Saturday ​May 20. We meet at 10am near the docks (look for a teal pickup truck). Throughout the day we will be removing invasive species and taking care of this special place....

Earth Day at SṈIDȻEȽ April 22

Earth Day at SṈIDȻEȽ April 22

Greeting SeaChange volunteers, Spring has arrived at the inlet! Everywhere we are seeing the amazing profusion of beautiful sounds and colours that this season brings with it; it is such a welcome experience after such a long winter. Come and experience it at our next...

Beach Enhancement Project: Phase 3 Completed!

Beach Enhancement Project: Phase 3 Completed!

On Friday, February 10th, at 5 am a barge of sand and gravel from Sechelt arrived in Brentwood Bay to begin the beach enhancement shore restoration in Tod Inlet (SṈIDȻEȽ or the Place of Blue Grouse). The placement of gravel and sand on the shore is the culmination of...

SṈIDȻEȽ Autumn 2016 Volunteer Days

SṈIDȻEȽ Autumn 2016 Volunteer Days

We are back at SṈIDȻEȽ for another round of volunteer days this autumn! We will be doing lots of planting on our new sites this fall and continuing to clear out the invasive sprouts before winter. Our autumn volunteer dates are Sept 17, Oct 1, Oct 15, Oct 29, Nov 12...

Watch this Space! New Restoration Areas at SṈIDȻEȽ

Watch this Space! New Restoration Areas at SṈIDȻEȽ

If you come to visit SṈIDȻEȽ (Tod Inlet) over the next few weeks, you will be able to witness the excavation of large tracts of invasive species as part of the continuing work by SeaChange Marine Conservation Society and Tsartlip First Nation to restore health and...

Thank you Green Teams!

Thank you Green Teams!

We had a great volunteer day last weekend, joined by the Greater Victoria Green Teams! Check out their photos and website. Our task was to remove the invasion of English ivy (Hedera helix) from the Chinese midden, a slope along the main trail from Wallace Rd. which...

Fascinating Finds in SNIDȻEȽ

Fascinating Finds in SNIDȻEȽ

In October 2013 volunteers found amazing pieces of SNIDCEL's industrial past last volunteer day: a dime from 1919 and a broken piece of a ceramic marmalade jar dated 1862!  These pieces serve to remind us of the layered cultural history of this place. We have had some...